Home Technology GM working on Headlights that track driver’s eye movements

GM working on Headlights that track driver’s eye movements

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With the continual advancement in science and technology, our everyday life is improved beyond measure and continue to do so. A reputed Car makers “General Motors” is developing smart headlights that will be able to aim based on where the driver is looking and and then shines in the direction where he is looking at, within a set range.

This technology being used by Vauxhall/Opel in context of
headlights is known as Adaptive Forward Lighting (AFL+). It features various lighting functions that include different
lighting patterns for varying driving environments, autonomous full beam
and aiming beam around corners using car’s steering as the variable.
They are also working on ‘LED matrix light system’ that monitors the light from oncoming vehicles and immediately deactivate particular
LEDs in the matrix cluster for accurate driving.

By the way, the company is continuously working from about two years on eye-tracking system. The system is also capable of vary the intensity of beam apart from adjusting the direction of beams.
This system relies on highly accurate camera that tracks prominent points, such as the nose and eyes, to detect movement and thereby the driver’s line of sight. Not only camera, infra-red sensors and central photo-diodes
are also used that allow the system to scan user’s eyes more than 50
times per second in night and dusk-time conditions.

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The
system uses a camera that tracks conspicuous points on the user’s face –
the nose and eyes – thus enabling it to ascertain the line of sight.
Apart from the camera, infra-red sensors and central photo-diodes are
also used which allow the system to scan user’s eyes more than 50 times
per second in night and dusk-time conditions.
also capable of changing the intensity of beam.
also capable of changing the intensity of beam.

also capable of changing the intensity of beam.

also capable of changing the intensity of beam.
The
system uses a camera that tracks conspicuous points on the user’s face –
the nose and eyes – thus enabling it to ascertain the line of sight.
Apart from the camera, infra-red sensors and central photo-diodes are
also used which allow the system to scan user’s eyes more than 50 times
per second in night and dusk-time conditions.
The major hurdle was dealing with the fact that a driver’s eyes will
jump from one focal point to another frequently during normal driving. So if the headlights were allowed to follow this movement precisely,
the vehicle’s light path would jerk around erratically. The solution was
a sophisticated delay algorithm which ensures a natural movement for
the light path.
also capable of changing the intensity of beam.

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